BASE Jumping

BASE Jumping – Four Levels Of Adventure

The Basics

The BASE in BASE Jumping is an acronym for Building, Antenna, Span (bridges) and Earth, representing the four categories of starting points, or exit points, usually used by BASE Jumpers.  The term was created by one Carl Boenish, the creative master behind the sport.  Carl made films involving jumps from all sorts of exit points during the 70’s.

BASE Jumping basically involves parachuting and wing-suit flying from a man-made structure or a cliff.

The Journey To Glory

There are a few steps to be followed in order to learn to become a successful BASE Jumper.  First and foremost, anyone wanting to participate in BASE Jumping, must learn how to Skydive first.  Skydiving as a discipline teaches vital techniques such as body control and positioning, as well as repositioning in various circumstances, canopy control, and of course, crisis control.

BASE Jumping enthusiasts agree that the general number of jumps to be completed in Skydiving, before attempting BASE Jumping, is 200 dives.

The next step is doing a FJC – First Jump Course.  Here you are taught all about the correct gear, a vital step in the learning curve.  During the sport’s humble beginnings, general Skydiving equipment was used for BASE Jumping, generally involving parachutes and deployment components.  Nowadays BASE Jumping has its own specialised set of utilities and gear, tailor made for the sport.  Once the First Jump Course has been completed, it is time to move on and graduate by being awarded a BASE number.

In BASE Jumping, BASE numbers are given to those who have made one jump from one of the four categories contained in the acronym – from a building, an antenna, from spans and earthen structures.    Upon completing a jump in each category, a BASE Jumper will proceed to apply for a BASE number.  Close to 2 000 BASE numbers have been issued since 2014, being a clear indication as to the growing popularity of the sport.

BASE Jumping Competitions

BASE Jumping Competitions are held throughout the year, with the judging criteria ranging from height to precise and accurate landings to free fall aerobics.  BASE Jumping usually occurs from lower altitudes than Skydiving, but it is still extremely difficult to pin-point the exact point of landing and this will affect the mobile betting sites odds.

The proBASE Worldcup was eventually born and is not the most prominent official BASE Jumping competition.  In 2013, the proBASE Worldcup tour included jumps at all of four locations – Kjerag, Norway; Innfjorden, Norway, Istanbul in Turkey and Stechelberg in Switzerland.  The Istanbul leg of the tour was scored on target landings and the others included a change of direction as well as a time trial.

Wagering On Dizzying Heights

Bookmakers now make provision for wagers to be placed on BASE Jumping events, and the outcomes predicted include an estimated finishing time, whether or not a target will be hit when the score is based on target jumping and what the particular score will be for a particular participant.

As the sport as grown, so too has interest increased from the world of sports betting.